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5 Morning Habits You Need to Stop Today

Bad morning habits result in stumbling through the day.

The way you get up is the way you show up.*

5 morning habits you need to stop today:

#1. Planning your day in the morning.

Plan tomorrow tonight.

Urgent overpowers important.

Give yourself space between planning and execution. When planning is close to execution, urgencies dominate thinking.

#2. Looking at email in the morning.

Ban electronic notifications until you’re centered for the day.

#3. Jumping out of bed in the morning.

Be grateful before your feet hit the floor.

Your brain loves to think about problems. Think about what’s right before letting your brain drag you into what’s wrong.

4 things to be grateful for when you wake up:

  1. Opportunities to serve. Think of one way you will serve others today.
  2. Loving relationships. Think of one person who loves you.
  3. Problems to solve. Think of the power of problems to bring out your best.
  4. People who pour into you. Think of specific individuals.

#4. Rushing.

The way you start the day sets the tone for the day.

When you’re stressed in the morning – and who isn’t – you’ll be more stressed by quitting time. (If you even have a clear quitting time.)

#5. Taking shallow breaths.

Breathe deep for one minute before your feet hit the floor. Combine your gratitude practice with breathing.

When you breathe in, think of something on your gratitude list. In your head say, “I’m thankful for ….” Don’t worry about coming up with new gratitude items for every breath. Be thankful for the same thing with every breath for one minute.

Tips:

Do the same things every morning. Don’t get creative. Be boring. Morning habits set your mind free. Rituals lower stress.

After a gratitude minute, put your feet on the floor.

Good-morning-habits pave the road for good days.

What good-morning habits do you suggest?

Still curious:

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* Waking Up on the Wrong Side of the Desk: The Effect of Mood on Work Performance

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