How to Fuel Tomorrow’s Energy Tonight

The Torah unexpectedly says, “And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.” The day begins in the evening.

Jewish scholars debate when the day actually begins. But the most important part of my morning begins in the evening.

Tunnel. Light at the end of the tunnel.

The most energizing thing I do is end my day well.

Noticing:

My journey into morning and evening rituals intensified in 2020. Before this, I rushed to work. Everything else was an inconvenience.

I still write every morning, but now I work to notice things. For example, I notice the sound my coffee cup makes when I set it on the coaster.

Noticing improved my day.

Noticing demonstrates I value what I do.

I restarted my gratitude journal last November. It helps me notice.

Surprised:

I’m surprised to notice that my morning ritual depends on what happens in the evening. The rhythm of evening and morning works for me.

The most energizing thing I do is end my day well.

Good endings protect you from stumbling forward with baggage from the previous day.

A successful day begins the night before.

  • Endings impact beginnings.
  • Preparation for the day begins at night.

A clear ending provides opportunity to refresh and begin again.

  • Finish stuff.
  • Prepare your work space.
  • Plan tomorrow’s beginning.
  • Relax.

Simple endings:

  • I like the symbolism of turning off my computer.
  • A brief evening journal.
  • Turn down the lights.
  • Listen to an audio book instead of TV.

Whatever evening ritual you adopt, make it simple. Complexity creates stress.

“Finish each day before you begin the next, and interpose a solid wall of sleep between the two.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

How might leaders sabotage their own energy?

What evening rituals might help leaders begin well in the morning?

A Formula for the Best Day Ever PT. II | Leadership Freak

Good Endings Promote Better Beginnings | Psychology Today

A Two Question Ritual to Change Your Day | Leadership Freak

The 7 Step Evening Ritual That Will Make You Happy | Observer