Week Highlights: 7/19 to 7/23

This week all my posts focused on stress. For your convenience – just in case you missed one – all the posts are listed below with links.

Road sign.

Stress relief this way.

“Remember that stress doesn’t come from what’s going on in your life. It comes from your thoughts about what’s going on in your life.” Andrew Bernstein, Philosopher

Monday:

Stressed person with tongue out. Quote, "I get stressed when people tell me to relax."

A REALISTIC APPROACH TO STRESS MANAGEMENT THAT DOESN’T CAUSE MORE STRESS

I hate the expression, ‘stress management’. I get stressed when people tell me to relax. Thick books about managing stress make my belly hurt.

Not all stress is bad.

Tuesday:

Butter sitting on frogs head. Letting go is an iterative process.

3 QUESTIONS THAT RESOLVE STRESS QUICKLY (Most viewed post of the week)

  1. What’s the worst that could happen.
  2. What would you like to do about that?
  3. How much does this matter?

Wednesday:

Picture of a monkey riding on its parent's back. Quote, "The cutest part of a monkey is its backside walking away from you."

STRESS: HOW TO GET SCREAMING MONKEYS OFF YOUR BACK

Sometimes stress is a screaming monkey that belongs to someone else.

4 people with a monkey ownership addiction:

  1. Helpful Helen.
  2. Compassionate Charlie.
  3. Brilliant Buford.
  4. Imaginative Ida.

Thursday:

Two potatoes in a pot with terrified faces. "Our ability to excel is only exceeded by our fear of screwing up."

HOW TO ANSWER THE VOICE IN YOUR HEAD THAT CREATES THINGS YOU DREAD

Stress is made by voices in your head, not circumstances, people, or events you dread.

The false safety of inaction prolongs the agonies of life.

Dr. Seuss believed the waiting place was the most useless place.

Friday:

Picture with one lit egg surrounded by dark eggs. "The rejection of inability prolongs incompetence."

How to Navigate the Gap Between Responsibility and Ability

Two factors influence your response to stressful situations – who you are and learned strategies.

Good people respond poorly to stress because they haven’t learned any better.