How to Find Your Grateful Mind

3 dangers of ingratitude:

#1. Missed opportunity.

Ungratefulness doesn’t create a bright future.

Ingratitude worries about the past.

A leader that’s focused on the past misses today’s opportunity.

Turn to the future:

  1. What three lessons is your past teaching you?
  2. How might your strengths be useful today?
  3. What might you do today to create the future you desire?

#2. Low energy and lost vision.

Maybe the emails just keep coming. Maybe one problem follows another.

What if:

  1. All the emails stopped?
  2. You never solved another problem?
  3. No one asked your advice again?

Sometimes the things you’re ungrateful for actually give meaning to life.

#3. Ingratitude tells others they’re losers.

An ungrateful leader tells other he doesn’t trust them to make progress.

Ungratefulness focuses on things OTHERS haven’t done or can’t do. 

3 ways to find your grateful mind:

Everything is easier with gratitude.

#1. Accept ungratefulness.

Fake it till you make it is useful, but denial doesn’t solve anything.

Keep an “I’m Ungrateful List” in your desk. Don’t do anything with the list. Just write it. Free your mind to focus on other things.

#2. Focus on YOUR responsibilities.

Entitlement destroys gratitude.

Sometimes ungratefulness is opportunity to matter.

When the cause of ingratitude is within your control, change it.

When the cause of ingratitude is out of your control, let it go. (You’ll be letting go a lot.)

Note: Reassign incompetent employees. Retrain them. Or generously manage them out. It’s not fair to others when you allow people to consistently fail.

#3. Express gratitude.

Don’t pretend you’re grateful. Express real gratitude.

  1. “I’m thankful we have room to improve.”
  2. “I”m thankful to learn about this problem before it gets worse.”
  3. “I’m thankful for the talented people on our team.”

Bonus: Write three thank you notes everyday for a week. (Not emails.)

What are the dangers of ingratitude?

How might leaders find a grateful mind?