How to Defeat Distraction and Heighten Satisfaction

I haven’t been a fan of all the mumbo jumbo about being present, until recently. Maybe I had too much to do?

Stress and anxiety reveal the danger of distraction and power of being present.

Distraction:

Hurry makes distracted leaders feel important.

#1. Every shiny object that drags you from the present dilutes your impact.

You’re never your best self when you’re distracted.

You bring your best self when you bring your whole self.

#2. Every urgent buzz or ding devalues the people around you.

You tell people they’re insignificant when you habitually check messages in their presence.

Rush and anxiety are permission to neglect people.

#3. Every distraction slows progress.

Distraction requires you to begin again. It’s more efficient to complete a task than to begin it several times.

Pollution:

Anxiety pollutes the present with imagined problems and future responsibilities.

A constant rush to the NEXT thing ruins THIS thing.

Don’t squander the present on the future.

Distracted leaders perpetually rush toward the future while neglecting the present. The pattern repeats tomorrow. Wouldn’t you like to live your life instead of waiting for it to get here?

Being present is:

#1. Giving undivided attention.

You can’t bring your best self when you’re rushing to the next thing. Enjoy what you’re doing now.

#2. Noticing yourself and others.

#3. Perceiving the process as well as the product.

#4. Doing one thing at a time.

Meditation:

Talk to yourself while slowly breathing in and slowly breathing out. (Close your eyes if it helps.)

Breathe in and say:

  1. This work matters.
  2. This moment matters.
  3. People depend on me.

Breathe out and say:

  1. Bring your best self.
  2. Give your best.
  3. Turn from distraction.

(A slow rhythm helps me.)

You have to be present to bring your best self.

How might leaders practice being present in a world full of distraction?