CANDOR THAT STRENGTHENS RELATIONSHIPS AND DELIVERS RESULTS – Part Two

My habit is to quickly get to a substantive topic, even if I don’t know you. It lets people know that I have meaningful conversations. It’s who I am and what I do.

 

Set a tone of candor by expressing sincere curiosity. But don’t be pushy.

When you meet someone notice the things they talk about and the way they talk. If they seem passionate, ask about passion. If they seem concerned, ask about their concerns.

Do they address the world from an organizational point of view or personal? Explain what you notice.

Do they seem frustrated? Bring it up.

Are they sensitive to office politics? Mention it.

Practicing candor when relationships are new:

  1. Compassion is candor’s soulmate. Candor doesn’t need to seem harsh.
  2. Say what you see when it surprises you.
  3. Inquire to learn, show respect, and connect.
  4. Don’t judge, correct, or out do.
  5. Acknowledge mistakes immediately.

Setting a tone of curious candor – early in relationships – makes it easier to dig into difficult topics later.

How might leaders practice candor early in relationships?

Part one: CANDOR THAT STRENGTHENS RELATIONSHIPS AND DELIVERS RESULTS