The Secret to Creating Happiness

Happiness is more a function of attitude than environment. People in the same environment may be happy or sad depending on their attitude.

Happiness within organizations:

Commitment is fundamental to happiness. Committed people are happier than uncommitted. Committed people work to make things work. Uncommitted people stand aloof, find fault, and inevitably grow unhappy.

We enhance our happiness quotient with our ability to make deep commitments. Half commitments are fully dissatisfying.

Leadership:

Successful leaders help others rise above completing tasks to making deep commitments. Commitments enhance buy-in; buy-in enhances happiness.

Help others deeply commit by:

  1. Providing channels for meaningful contribution. Everyone wants to matter.
  2. Helping them see where they fit in. Everyone needs to connect.
  3. Appreciating, recognizing, and rewarding.
  4. Elevating belief in their potential. This may be the most important thing you do.
  5. Developing their skills. Personal growth invites and excites.
  6. Leveraging their strengths. Although fixing is necessary, do it less.
  7. Making progress. Success invites commitment. Create and celebrate small wins.

Most importantly:

Organizational vision that expresses personal values produces passionate commitment. Jim Collins would say, “Get the right people on the bus.” The “right” people share values.

Commitment and dissatisfaction:

Deeply committed people may become deeply dissatisfied.

  1. Dreaming dreams that don’t succeed frustrates.
  2. Miscommunication regarding values disappoints.
  3. Feeling unsupported and unappreciated drains commitment.

Don’t expect them to be committed to you
if you aren’t committed to them.

Danger and opportunity:

Weak commitment results in dissatisfaction; dissatisfaction produces blame. The uncommitted always blame, point fingers, assign fault, and self-justify.

Commitment, on the other hand, produces responsibility. Committed people figure out how to make things work. Committed people are always happier than uncommitted.

How can leaders invite others to make deep commitments?